SRT® Shoutback: Changing lanes at 150 miles per hour.

If you’re going 150 miles per hour on a racetrack, and you have to swerve to avoid something, you want to make sure the car has stability to handle the situation.
Posted on Dec 07, 2012

If you’re going 150 miles per hour on a racetrack, and you have to swerve to avoid something, you want to make sure the car has stability to handle the situation. A car’s aerodynamic balance is extremely important.

SRT® does a lot of testing to ensure that lift and downforce are correctly balanced from front to back. Stability comes from the rear tires. If you have lift back there, when you do a high-speed lane change the back end will try to pass up the front end of the car. Wind tunnels are a great starting point, but before a car earns the SRT badge, it must execute a 150 mile per hour lane change in the real world.

SRT engineers Erich Heuschele and Chris Winkler are both racecar drivers. That’s why we put them in the seat for our highest velocity test. They have the instincts and the capability to handle the car if something goes wrong.

"The amount of real estate you cover at 150 miles per hour is massive, so we take the car onto a massive oval," Heuschele said. "We start at 80 miles per hour on the straightaway. The driver performs an aggressive double lane change to test the car’s aero balance. Then, we repeat the test at 100, 120 and build up to 150."

"Not all of our competitors pass the test, even at 120," Winkler said. "If they don’t pass at 120, there’s no point in taking them to 150."

Our vehicles only pass this test if our engineers feel they’re stable. These vehicles earn the SRT badge once they’ve passed.

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