An aggressive complement: Stripes on the 2013 SRT® Viper.

Stripes bring out the true personality in a car, and the 2013 SRT Viper certainly has a persona all its own. Whether it's the 2013 SRT Viper or the SRT Viper GTS, the bold stripes glisten, really standing out and creating a distinction between the two.
Posted on Dec 06, 2012

Stripes bring out the true personality in a car, and the 2013 SRT® Viper certainly has a persona all its own. Whether it's the 2013 SRT Viper or the SRT Viper GTS, the bold stripes glisten, really standing out and creating a distinction between the two.

"The stripes are one of the biggest differences between the SRT Viper and the SRT Viper GTS," said Mark Trostle, Head of Design for SRT, Mopar and Motorsports. "The main idea behind that was to get some separation between the two, and using different stripes was a good way to differentiate."

The stripes on the SRT Viper GTS measure about nine-and-a-half inches in width and run the entire length of the car, from the front fascia all the way to the bottom of the rear fascia. Stripe packages available for 2013 include: Black, Gunmetal Pearl and Billet Silver Metallic, while Bright White stripes will also be offered on the Viper GTS when delivered in Blue.

"The stripes on the GTS hold true to the original Viper GTS where they go end-to-end through both the front and rear fascia," said Trostle. "They are wide and really beefy and the width of the stripes must be sensitive to the vehicle design. The stripes need to truly complement the shape of the car, the forms on the hood and the fascia. It really is an art form to get the stripes to complement the car."

Stripes grace the hood and rear decklid of the SRT Viper, with the width being a touch narrower than their counterparts on the SRT Viper GTS. The stripes on the SRT Viper taper down to complement the shape of the hood, and do likewise on the rear decklid.

The striping process on the SRT Viper was a collaborative effort between Trostle's design team and a number of individuals, including Ralph Gilles, President and CEO, SRT Brand and Motorsports. Gilles spent a large portion of time in the design studio physically laying out a variety of stripes on the car to get just the right look and feel.

"We worked closely with Ralph (Gilles) on striping the car," said Trostle. "He is passionate about everything, but the stripes in particular. It was neat to have him involved that closely in the process with the stripes."

A unique process of "burying" the stripes is used when painting the body panels of the SRT Viper and Viper GTS. By burying the stripes in the clear coat paint, a smooth surface is created with no ridgelines. Prefix Corporation, based in Auburn Hills, Mich., handles all the painting and striping of the 2013 SRT Viper. The body panels of the Viper are painted and striped before assembly at the Connor Avenue plant in Detroit.

"Every single piece on the new Viper had to be right for the customer," said Trostle. "We knew 'burying' the stripe was the right thing to do for our customers, and we had to figure out a way to process that. We worked closely with Prefix to develop this process. It's seamless now. Working with them early on allowed us to do this."

Stripes speak to both performance and style, just like an SRT. The pairing of stripes with the dashing colors of the 2013 SRT Viper and SRT Viper GTS fit this mold perfectly.

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